When the 2017 Golden Globe nominations were announced, Gina Rodriguez (@hereisgina) had just completed a Muay Thai workout … in Thailand. “We got to the house and still had 30 minutes before the announcement, so I stripped down to my birthday suit, and let go,” says Gina. “I gave the anxiety, pressure and illusions we carry about our worth and threw them out.” This is the third time Gina has been nominated for her “Jane the Virgin” role — she took home the award for best actress in a TV series musical or comedy in 2015. “I’m humbled to be in a category with women I admire and adore,” says Gina. “Jane is my love child. I love coming to work, and I love playing this woman I wish I was more like in real life.” Photo by @hereisgina
Nasty
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Cool they choose someone picture all the time. ...
Like ricambio
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This past weekend, thousands of community members — like Sam Vasquez (@ettwas), here in Mexico — gathered around the world to celebrate Worldwide InstaMeet 15 (#WWIM15❤️) and its theme: kindness. Follow along as we feature more of our favorite moments. Photo by @ettwas
Actor Tom Holland (@tomholland2013) found out he was Spider-Man on Instagram. “Marvel had posted a photo and said, ‘Go to our website to find out who the next Spider-Man is!’” says 20-year-old Tom, who grew up in London. “I rushed to my computer, and lucky old me, it said my name. I went absolutely crazy.” With one film as Spider-Man under his belt and a second, “Spider-Man: Homecoming” (@spidermanmovie), coming out this summer, Tom adapted to his role and the physical training it demands, from freerunning to gymnastics — anyone who frequents his account is familiar with Tom’s signature backflips. But his favorite part about being Spider-Man is meeting kids while dressed as the superhero. “It’s such a joyous experience to see how happy it makes them to meet the real-life Spider-Man,” he says. Watch our Instagram story right now to see more from Tom. 🕷️
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“I can’t really say I had any female riders to look up to,” says motocross champion Vicki Golden (@vgolden423). As a three-time X Games gold medalist, and the first female to qualify for Supercross and Arenacross, the 24-year-old from Southern California is paving the way for female riders. Despite concussions and major injuries, Vicki has one motto: never quit. “Broken bones and all that stuff is just part of the game,” she says. This post is in celebration of Women’s History Month. Throughout March, we’ll be highlighting the stories of women doing extraordinary things around the world. Photo of @vgolden423 by @matt_cordova
A visitor to the sculpture garden in Rome’s Villa Medici takes a new look at some ancient relics. #TheWeekOnInstagram Photo by @lenovchi
In the waters off of Vitória, Brazil, Pepê Silva (@pepesilva_) draws inspiration from the sea and sunlight. “When I photograph someone, I try to put them in sync with these two elements.” #TheWeekOnInstagram Photo by @pepesilva_
This cool cat’s curled tail, captured in action by Volkan Çatıkkaş (@volkancatikkas), swung its way into our #BoomerangOfTheWeek. 😻 Add #BoomerangOfTheWeek to your next Boomerang’s caption — yours might show up here on @instagram. #Boomerang by @volkancatikkas
“At our core, Girlvana is empowering the next generation of women through movement and mindfulness,” says yoga teacher Alex Mazerolle (@allymaz) from Vancouver, Canada. Alex is the founder of Girlvana Yoga (@girlvanayoga), a community on a mission to support teenage girls through yoga, meditation and mentorship. “I grew up competitively dancing. I had an eating disorder. I doubted myself and my place in this world. I came to the yoga mat as a physical practice — I thought it was going to keep me flexible and strong. What it ended up being was a big overhaul of my life. After I had been teaching yoga for four years, I realized if someone had taught me how to breathe, if someone listened to me from a place of compassion at 14 years old, my life would’ve looked a lot different. The work I do with Girlvana keeps me so accountable, and so real and transparent about my relationship to my body and food. Embedded in its philosophy, yoga has this this intrinsic self-care and kindness that this is your one chance, your one vehicle, and to honor and find love and compassion for your body is much more fruitful than being at war with yourself.” Photo by @allymaz
Last September, we made a commitment to the community to keep Instagram a safe place for everyone. This year we will continue to act on that commitment and also focus on fostering kindness. The first step is to celebrate the kindness our community is already known for. On March 25 and 26, Instagrammers will come together for Worldwide InstaMeet 15. Join an InstaMeet near you — or spread kindness by leaving an encouraging comment, giving an inspiring person a like or sharing a message of support with a friend. As part of our goal to build a safe environment, we also have some updates to announce. Soon you may notice a screen over sensitive photos and videos when you scroll through your feed or visit a profile. While these posts don’t violate our guidelines, someone in the community has reported them and our review team has confirmed they are sensitive. This change means you are less likely to have surprising or unwanted experiences in the app. If you’d like to see a post that is covered with a screen, simply tap to reveal the photo or video. We also have developed a new, easy-to-use site where you can learn about keeping yourself safe on Instagram. Check out instagram-together.com for more information. Our teams are focused on making Instagram a kind, welcoming place for everyone, and we’re just getting started. Kevin Systrom Co-founder & CEO
Photographer Daniella Zalcman (@dzalcman) has her #EyesOn a stolen generation. Starting in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, indigenous children across the United States, Canada and Australia were taken from their families and placed in boarding schools in an effort to assimilate them into western culture — and to strip away their own. Phyllis Kitching (pictured), an Aboriginal Australian, recalls her childhood to Daniella. “No one could ever understand what I experienced,” Phyllis says. “I can describe it and you might understand my words, but you'll never understand what I lost in that place.” Using portraits, artifacts, oral testimonies and composite images, Daniella explores the enduring legacy of these programs. “The story, at its core, is about memory and intergenerational trauma and how much that can affect not just a population and its cultural identity, but that of future generations as well,” she says. Explore more of Daniella’s work on our Instagram story. Photo of Phyllis Kitching by @dzalcman
While exploring the light and shadow of a structure by Catalan architects Enric Miralles and Carme Pinòs, Valle García (@valleklau) was struck by two thoughts. “We are alive, and we are still young,” she says. “These architects understood and accepted the cycle of life as a link between past, present and future.” #WHPyoungatheart Photo by @valleklau
“We should all enjoy the simple things in life, whatever our age,” says Marcelo García Calviño (@marchi3003), who brought his best friend @veronarupes (whom he met through Instagram) to one of his favorite spots in Cabo de Home, Spain. “As soon as she saw that giant shell, she couldn’t resist the temptation to climb through as if she were a child again.” #WHPyoungatheart Follow along as we feature more of our favorite submissions to last weekend’s hashtag project. Photo by @marchi3003
A simple reminder from Turtle Williams (@turtledove.a): You’re never too old to make a wish. #WHPyoungatheart Photo by @turtledove.a
March 20 marks Nowruz, the #PersianNewYear and the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. For Iranian photojournalist Majid Saeedi (@majidsaeedi), the 13-day holiday marks some of his sweetest childhood memories, like family gatherings around tasty meals and sweet treats, participating in traditional ceremonies and picnicking outside on the final day. “It is a family holiday and spending a while with my family is the best memory that I have from Nowruz,” he says. Photo by @majidsaeedi
Flying at more than 220 miles (354 kilometers) per hour, Amelie Windel (@ams_w) has bigger things to worry about than a picture-perfect smile. “It’s a high-stress environment,” says 26-year-old Amelie, the youngest female aerobatic pilot in the UK. “One thing I want to change is how female athletes are perceived — or any female in a typically male-dominated world.” Amelie doesn’t buy into the expectation that she should always be smiling ear to ear; her focus is on overcoming everyday obstacles and, of course, her time in the sky. “Aerobatics is ultimate 3-D freedom,” she says. “In a modern-day world, many women still face hardships due to their gender and feel like they can’t be themselves in day-to-day life. But when I’m in that cockpit, it’s just me. I’m completely in charge of what I’m doing.” Check out our Instagram story to see more from Amelie in the sky. ✈️ This post is in celebration of Women’s History Month. Throughout March, we’ll be highlighting the stories of women doing extraordinary things around the world. Video by @ams_w
Communities of pushpins, pencils and erasers at odds with each other, trees that hug all day — animation director and writer Sean Charmatz (@sean_charmatz) breathes life into everyday sights. “The idea is that if you look close enough and take a moment to observe, you will see all of this,” says Sean. “To me, there is magic in seeing a story that was already happening between objects. I feel the magic, so believe others will too.” Growing up, Sean, now 36, was drawn to the characters and letters of graffiti in big cities like San Francisco and New York. Today, his work as an animation director and writer allows him to tap into that childhood joy and share it with others. “It means a lot to me that people enjoy the work and that it has changed the way they look at the world,” he says. “I want my account to be a place where everyone can feel creative and be inspired.” Photo by @sean_charmatz