On the night of the Golden Globes, expect actress Mandy Moore (@mandymooremm) to let loose with her fellow “This Is Us” cast members — the first-time nominee can’t wait to celebrate. “I think people have been hungry for a story about human connection and the intricacies of family dynamics,” says Mandy of the show’s appeal. “The obstacles and struggles the characters in the show are facing are universal and have really struck a chord in the hearts and minds of fans of the show.” When she’s not filming, Mandy hangs with her loved ones, hikes with her dogs in Southern California and shares lots of everyday moments with her fans. “I love having the ability to share my highest highs and the smallest, seemingly most insignificant moments of my life with a whole group of friends and strangers alike,” says Mandy. “And getting responses in real time is always a trip.” Photo by @mandymooremm
After 25 years of work, one of the greatest wilderness conservation success stories in history came to fruition — and photographer Jimmy Chin (@jimmy_chin) was there to document it. Tompkins Conservation, a wilderness protection organization founded by Kris Tompkins and the late Doug Tompkins, made the largest private-to-public land donation in history. The one million acres (405,000 hectares) of land donated by the Tompkins, along with the 10 million (4,050,00 hectares) pledged by the Chilean government, will create five new national parks and expand three others in Chile. “It’s incredibly beautiful terrain and landscapes — coastline, rainforest, glaciated mountains,” says Jimmy, who spent time exploring the vast, now-protected land during the official signing of the agreement between Kris and Chilean president Michelle Bachelet in March. “Kris and Doug were so passionate about this land and understood its value — not for utilitarian, human needs, but its inherent value to exist on this planet,” says Jimmy. “Humans are so anthropocentric; we think about how things fulfill our needs. But wilderness is above that. It’s beyond us.” #EarthDay 🌎 Photo by @jimmy_chin
A good splash in the suburbs stars in our #BoomerangOfTheWeek. On a rainy day in New York City, photo editor Kruti Kothari (@o_bani_thani) ventured to New Jersey to visit with a friend over a cup of coffee. “The sun came out just before sunset and gave everything new life. All the kids were running out of their houses with a sense of freedom after a long day at home,” says Kruti. “Adulthood is so much about issues that we forget to lose ourselves in simple joy.” Add #BoomerangOfTheWeek to your next Boomerang’s caption — yours might show up here on @instagram. #Boomerang by @o_bani_thani
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At 16 years old, Morgan Hipworth (@bistromorgan) has dreamed up over 2,000 doughnut flavors and opened his own shop, Bistro Morgan, in Windsor, Australia. Unlike most entrepreneurs dealing with the demands of their first business, Morgan is also a full-time high school student. “One of the biggest challenges is time management, managing my time inside of school and getting as much homework as I can done,” he says. “I’m always working around that.” But seeing people take a big bite or shoot one of Morgan’s signature syringes of filling — a concept he created to stand out — is worth the energy and effort. “Food plays such an active part in people’s lives,” says Morgan. “It can determine their mood or how their day is going. I love being a part of that.” #MadeToCreate Watch Morgan make some of his signature creations right now on our Instagram story! Photo by @bistromorgan
“Child marriage is a root cause for a lot of the issues that girls face,” says photojournalist Stephanie Sinclair (@stephsinclairpix). Her ongoing 15-year series “Too Young to Wed” (@tooyoungtowed) sheds light on the challenges girls face — cyclical poverty, curtailed education, psychological trauma, sexual violence and, at times, the transmission of HIV — when forced to marry at a young age. The work has taken her to numerous countries where the practice is common, including Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Nigeria and Yemen. “While it has similarities in certain parts of the world, it has differences,” Stephanie says. “There’s different cultural nuances in each place.” Today in Washington, D.C., the International Women’s Media Foundation (@theiwmf) is celebrating Stephanie with the Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award. “It’s a little bit bittersweet because the award is in the name of a colleague whose life ended doing this work,” explains Stephanie. “It means even more to be recognized with an award with Anja’s name. We crossed paths several times in Iraq and Afghanistan. I just don’t want to go without saying — it means a lot.” Photo by @stephsinclairpix
Hello, world! It's time for a hair-raising edition of #WeeklyFluff. Apparently, one cat’s trash is Ryo Yamazaki’s (@rojiman) treasure. Maru (pictured) is one of the three felines whose shed fur is recycled and carefully crafted into hats for cats. Follow @rojiman to keep up with this creative haberdasher’s designs.
In the US Pacific Northwest, Joseph Watrous (@gemini_digitized) waited for the perfect morning light to hit the farmland in front of him. “I could wake up here every day and never miss the city!” #WHPgoodmorning Photo by @gemini_digitized
It took Amy Corson (@amy_corson) a few tries at setting a timer on her camera and hopping under the covers to get a shot she liked, but the playful result was worth the effort. “Good mornings and coffee are pretty synonymous,” she says. “You can’t have one without the other.” #WHPgoodmorning Follow along to see more of our favorite submissions to last weekend’s hashtag project. Photo by @amy_corson
Ülevus (@ulevus) is a Brazilian brand on a mission to make gender equality more widespread. Paola Penna met her co-founder and girlfriend Larissa Rodrigues while in college. “We were already indignant with what the fashion industry had to offer us, so we decided to create a brand without gender division that could withstand the demand of young consumers like us who were tired of stereotypes,” says Paola, who’s now 22 and lives in São Paulo. “On October 12, 2014, we opened a store for online shopping. Since that time, we have been applying the concept of not having a gender division in our clothes.” Paola and Larissa stay motivated knowing they provide an open, inclusive and stylish destination for shoppers. “We want to make the place where we live a more egalitarian place even with our differences,” says Paola, “which in the end, make us all human.” Watch our Instagram story to learn more about Ülevus. Photo by @ulevus
Coffee just tastes better when you drink it outside — especially in the early morning light of Valencia, Spain. ☕️ #WHPgoodmorning Photo by @andrescarrionbaz
Starting this week, you can save posts into private collections. Tap and hold the bookmark icon underneath any post to save it directly to a collection. You can create and name a new collection when you save a post, or you can add it to one you’ve already created. You can also create a collection out of your existing saved posts. Tap the plus icon in the top right corner, give your collection a name and select the saved posts you’d like to add. You can find your collections on the saved posts tab on your profile. Just like all saved posts, your collections are private — only you can see them. Since we introduced the ability to save posts last December, 46 percent of Instagrammers have saved at least one post. Whether you want to plan your next day trip, revisit your favorite artists’ illustrations or always have some animal videos on hand, collections can help you keep track of the posts you want to remember. To learn more about save collections, check out help.instagram.com. This update is available for iOS and Android in the Apple App Store and Google Play as part of Instagram version 10.16.
Fiesta (@fiestathecat), a posh and playful Jack Russell terrier, peers out at the world from a pool of daisies. #TheWeekOnInstagram Photo by @fiestathecat
“A wise man once said, a handplant a day keeps the doctor away,” writes Stefan Mahlknecht (@stefan_mahl) in his caption. An outdoor photographer and graduate student living in South Tyrol, Italy, Stefan thought this trick’s shape mirrored Giau Pass, the mountain in the background, located in the Italian Dolomites. #TheWeekOnInstagram Photo by @stefan_mahl
For two weekends in April, the small desert oasis of Indio, California, is a destination for tens of thousands of @coachella attendees, who flock for music, food and art. Two of the featured artists this year are Adam Frezza and Terri Chiao, who make up the Brooklyn-based duo Chiaozza (@chiaozza). “Chiaozza Garden” is an entire acre of tall, bulbous, colorful structures — all of which have whimsical names like Giros, Dollop Sprouts, Twin Lumps and Exquisite Plants — that stand out even in the vastness of the festival grounds. “When we were designing this garden,” says Terri, “we thought a lot about the experience of the light in the desert — how it gets kind of bleached out during the day, but the colors start to really glow at dusk and sunrise.” Evolving from a sketch in their studio to 8-ton sculptures made from plywood, lathe, stucco and cement in the center of Coachella, the pair had a hand in every stage of the production process. “It’s the largest project we’ve ever done,” says Adam. “It’s so fun to see people engage with the work,” which includes dancing with some of the pieces’ rubber tassels and resting in the late afternoon shade the structures provide. “Over time, we want this work to continuously befuddle and offer a curious sense of imagination.” Photo by @cole_younger_
Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPgoodmorning This one’s for you, early risers. The goal this weekend is to take photos and videos that capture the sights and sounds of the world waking up — like this one by @stinayulia. Here are a few tips to get started: Take advantage of soft morning light, whether it streams through your bedroom window or lights your favorite hiking trail at sunrise. Record quiet moments with your family before the day starts moving: still-sleeping portraits, steam rising off a cup of fresh coffee and reading the newspaper together. Consider morning moments that aren’t slow — not everyone has the weekends off of work. Take a Hyperlapse of the vendors setting up the fish market before the sun comes up, or a Boomerang of park ranger out in the field. PROJECT RULES: Please add the #WHPgoodmorning hashtag only to photos and videos taken over this weekend and only submit your own visuals to the project. If you include music in your video submissions, please only use music to which you own the rights. Any tagged photo or video taken over the weekend is eligible to be featured next week. Featured photo by @stinayulia
Gwen Coyne (@gwencoyne) may spend her weekdays in a cubicle, but the digital marketing manager, who works in San Francisco, uses her weekends to explore California with her family and her camera. “I live in such a beautiful place that if you watch and wait, something magical usually happens,” says Gwen. After working with film and digital photography, Gwen began taking photos with her phone after the birth of her now 6-year-old daughter, who has asthma and has been in the hospital a few times over the course of her young life. As a manifestation of her concern, Gwen turned her phone’s camera lens toward her daughter. “I want to create images that help remind us of the time between the more intense periods,” she says. The black-and-white quality of her photographs helps to further remove the scenes from reality. “I’m more interested in collecting snippets rather than documenting specifics,” says Gwen. “I want my daughter to be able to fill in the gaps with her imagination when she gets older.” Photo by @gwencoyne