Actor Sterling Brown (@sterlingkb1) was on his way to work when he learned about his Golden Globe nomination for his role in “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story,” where he played prosecutor Christopher Darden. “It was like putting together a puzzle piece,” says Sterling of preparing for the role; the whole cast did a ton of reading and he poured over video footage, namely interviews with Charlie Rose and Oprah. When he’s not filming, Sterling goes to the gym, plays with his kids and is no stranger to binge watching TV shows — it's simple pleasures that provide Sterling with joy and happiness. “When I hear my baby boy singing, that makes me happy. When I get to kiss my kids at night, it makes me happy. A good movie. A good meal. A clean house. A clean house makes me very happy. 😊” Photo by @sterlingkb1
Wow
Nice pic...
👍
Te dejo un abrazo no te conocia enviame una sin anteojos. Buena suerte!! Desde Buenos Aires, Argentina
mainmsniroj
O yea
The Embassy of Kindness (@theembassyofkindness) all started at an InstaMeet in Melbourne, Australia. Kanesan Nathan (@legojacker) and Amal Bleed (@toffyinc) led a photo walk around the city, documenting what kindness looked like with fellow, local Instagrammers. Then, they started talking to strangers. “Our very first portrait of kindness was a man called Philip. He was kind but he was skeptical about the power of kindness to change the world,” explains Kanesan. “We looked at each other and thought, ‘Challenge accepted.’” Today, through their portraiture and captions, The Embassy of Kindness seeks to exemplify how kindness can connect us all. “Any act, no matter how big or small, has the power to change a person’s life in a profound way,” says Amal. “It’s about celebrating our shared humanity.” For this Worldwide InstaMeet (#WWIM15❤️), Kanesan will lead an event from Canberra, where he now lives, at the Australian National Botanic Gardens, and Amal will host from Melbourne’s city center. Both InstaMeets encourage participants to start conversations about kindness and create portraits that have become the basis for The Embassy’s photo project. @theembassyofkindness photos by @toffyinc and @legojacker
Last September, we made a commitment to the community to keep Instagram a safe place for everyone. This year we will continue to act on that commitment and also focus on fostering kindness. The first step is to celebrate the kindness our community is already known for. On March 25 and 26, Instagrammers will come together for Worldwide InstaMeet 15. Join an InstaMeet near you — or spread kindness by leaving an encouraging comment, giving an inspiring person a like or sharing a message of support with a friend. As part of our goal to build a safe environment, we also have some updates to announce. Soon you may notice a screen over sensitive photos and videos when you scroll through your feed or visit a profile. While these posts don’t violate our guidelines, someone in the community has reported them and our review team has confirmed they are sensitive. This change means you are less likely to have surprising or unwanted experiences in the app. If you’d like to see a post that is covered with a screen, simply tap to reveal the photo or video. We also have developed a new, easy-to-use site where you can learn about keeping yourself safe on Instagram. Check out instagram-together.com for more information. Our teams are focused on making Instagram a kind, welcoming place for everyone, and we’re just getting started. Kevin Systrom Co-founder & CEO
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Photographer Daniella Zalcman (@dzalcman) has her #EyesOn a stolen generation. Starting in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, indigenous children across the United States, Canada and Australia were taken from their families and placed in boarding schools in an effort to assimilate them into western culture — and to strip away their own. Phyllis Kitching (pictured), an Aboriginal Australian, recalls her childhood to Daniella. “No one could ever understand what I experienced,” Phyllis says. “I can describe it and you might understand my words, but you'll never understand what I lost in that place.” Using portraits, artifacts, oral testimonies and composite images, Daniella explores the enduring legacy of these programs. “The story, at its core, is about memory and intergenerational trauma and how much that can affect not just a population and its cultural identity, but that of future generations as well,” she says. Explore more of Daniella’s work on our Instagram story. Photo of Phyllis Kitching by @dzalcman
“We should all enjoy the simple things in life, whatever our age,” says Marcelo García Calviño (@marchi3003), who brought his best friend @veronarupes (whom he met through Instagram) to one of his favorite spots in Cabo de Home, Spain. “As soon as she saw that giant shell, she couldn’t resist the temptation to climb through as if she were a child again.” #WHPyoungatheart Follow along as we feature more of our favorite submissions to last weekend’s hashtag project. Photo by @marchi3003
A simple reminder from Turtle Williams (@turtledove.a): You’re never too old to make a wish. #WHPyoungatheart Photo by @turtledove.a
With a few cleverly placed paper hats, Juj (@picturingjuj) creates a whimsical scene of a 🌵party. #WHPyoungatheart Photo by @picturingjuj
March 20 marks Nowruz, the #PersianNewYear and the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. For Iranian photojournalist Majid Saeedi (@majidsaeedi), the 13-day holiday marks some of his sweetest childhood memories, like family gatherings around tasty meals and sweet treats, participating in traditional ceremonies and picnicking outside on the final day. “It is a family holiday and spending a while with my family is the best memory that I have from Nowruz,” he says. Photo by @majidsaeedi
Communities of pushpins, pencils and erasers at odds with each other, trees that hug all day — animation director and writer Sean Charmatz (@sean_charmatz) breathes life into everyday sights. “The idea is that if you look close enough and take a moment to observe, you will see all of this,” says Sean. “To me, there is magic in seeing a story that was already happening between objects. I feel the magic, so believe others will too.” Growing up, Sean, now 36, was drawn to the characters and letters of graffiti in big cities like San Francisco and New York. Today, his work as an animation director and writer allows him to tap into that childhood joy and share it with others. “It means a lot to me that people enjoy the work and that it has changed the way they look at the world,” he says. “I want my account to be a place where everyone can feel creative and be inspired.” Photo by @sean_charmatz
A herd of deer wandering through the still-wintry countryside of Hokkaido, Japan, drew Hidetoshi Kikuchi’s (@hidetoshi_kikuchi) attention — and his drone, theirs. #TheWeekOnInstagram Photo by @hidetoshi_kikuchi
“From a feminist standpoint, collaboration is essential to my practice, politically and artistically,” says Madelyne Beckles (@bellhoox), an artist who lives in Montreal. “It will always make work stronger and ideas come off more potent when there are different people involved working towards the same vision or goal. Also, to be real: you can’t do everything yourself! @petrafcollins and I met in grade nine and clicked right away. We’ve both evolved into different artists but love working together because we are such great friends and our difference lends itself well to each other’s practices.” This post is part of “In Search of Us,” a digital salon curated by @petrafcollins and @bellhoox. Their upcoming event #PopRallyxPetra at @themuseumofmodernart celebrates the representation of women by women. Photos and videos by @bellhoox
For Akhwaf Habiburrahman (@akhwaf), an Indonesian photographer living in Germany, the unplanned photos are the best ones — like this one captured just before sunset from a skate park in Frankfurt, Germany. “The more spontaneous the shot, the better it is.” #TheWeekOnInstagram Photo by @akhwaf
Our #BoomerangOfTheWeek from Leticia Ramos (@letizilla) takes us on a wild rainbow ride. 🌈 Add #BoomerangOfTheWeek to your next Boomerang’s caption — yours might show up here on @instagram.
Professional Irish dancer Tyler Schwartz (@tylerschwartzdance) loves to play off his crowd’s energy. “Irish dance is a rowdy, fun and high-energy dance form that usually involves a lot of audience participation,” says 25-year-old Tyler, who lives in Chicago. “When the audience is on the same wavelength as you, there is absolutely nothing like it!” After competing around the world for many years, Tyler now shares the stage, performing with his former opponents — he calls them some of his closest friends. This year, he has Saint Patrick’s Day off. “I’m planning on meeting up with a bunch of my old Irish dance friends to celebrate,” he says. Today, we’re celebrating with Tyler’s skills. Watch our Instagram story to see some of his awe-inspiring choreography. ☘️ Video of Tyler and @missemilymacc by @tylerschwartzdance
“I’ve celebrated this day in the past, but it’s different in Ireland,” says American expat Elizabeth Lamb (@ebdeco) of Saint Patrick’s Day. Shamrocks aside, Elizabeth says it’s a time for friends and family. “The tradition here is to go to Mass in the morning, and after go watch the parade,” she says, which is followed by meeting friends at the pub and listening to traditional Irish music. After visiting Ireland as a teenager, Elizabeth returned to research her family history and wound up falling so in love with the country that four years ago, she moved into an old house on a sheep farm in Donegal, overlooking the North Atlantic. “The Irish landscapes, especially the rugged beauty of Donegal, are some of the most beautiful I’ve ever seen,” says Elizabeth. “I love the ever-changing light, the unspoiled raw beauty and the old stone walls, castles and cottages steeped in history.” Plus, she adds, “Where else can you find a crock of gold at the end of the rainbow?” 🍀 Photo by @ebdeco
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill senior Alex Koszeghy’s (@alexkosz) commitment to sparkle (and glitter) bursted out of struggle. “For the majority of my life, I really struggled with a lot of insecurities and self-esteem problems. These, along with my desire to be liked and accepted by others, led to me developing anorexia as a teenager — which I then struggled with for many years. Thankfully, I was able to push through and find recovery and freedom,” says Alex, now 23. “It is amazing how different life starts to become when you really love yourself. I have stopped trying to hide who I am and have just let the world see my sparkle!” Last year, Alex attended a UNC Tar Heels game painted up in glitter for the first time. “I will never forget that day for as long as I live, and I realized that there was no going back. There is nothing that compares to the feeling of being covered in paint alongside other Heels cheering on the team!” Check out @marchmadness’ Instagram story to see Alex and other college basketball fans gear up and support their teams. Photo by @alexkosz