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Slowly but surely, greenery takes back control in Artem Rozhnov’s (@artemi) #WHPnaturalbeauty submission. 🌿 Photo by @artemi
Mother Nature dazzles as the northern lights dance across the sky, illuminating the jagged peaks of Norway’s second-largest island. #WHPnaturalbeauty Follow along to see more of our favorite submissions to last weekend’s hashtag project. Photo by @eventyr
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A herd of goats race the setting sun in Madurai, India. #TheWeekOnInstagram Photo by @sreevathsav
Photographer Ragnhild Vaaler Furulund (@ragnhildsvisuelledesign) found the perfect curtain to filter the morning light in Norway. #TheWeekOnInstagram Photo by @ragnhildsvisuelledesign
A good splash in the suburbs stars in our #BoomerangOfTheWeek. On a rainy day in New York City, photo editor Kruti Kothari (@o_bani_thani) ventured to New Jersey to visit with a friend over a cup of coffee. “The sun came out just before sunset and gave everything new life. All the kids were running out of their houses with a sense of freedom after a long day at home,” says Kruti. “Adulthood is so much about issues that we forget to lose ourselves in simple joy.” Add #BoomerangOfTheWeek to your next Boomerang’s caption — yours might show up here on @instagram. #Boomerang by @o_bani_thani
Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPnaturalbeauty Our planet is a timeless source of discovery, wonder and inspiration. This weekend, let’s celebrate Earth’s beauty. Here are a few tips to get you started: Spend time in a majestic landscape. Mountains, beaches, plains, forests — our land is diverse and grand, and it would take lifetimes to experience it all. How much can you capture within the frame of one photograph or video? Look for action and movement within the larger scene. Focus on the smaller details. Our planet may be vast, but there are millions of tiny, beautiful moments playing out in front of us every day: a blooming flower pushing through the cracks in the sidewalk, a trickle of water feeding a small pool in the forest or a tree swaying gently in the breeze. Keep an eye out for how nature weaves its way into man-made scenes. City and country alike have their own elements of natural beauty. PROJECT RULES: Please add the #WHPnaturalbeauty hashtag only to photos and videos taken over this weekend and only submit your own visuals to the project. If you include music in your video submissions, please only use music to which you own the rights. Any tagged photo or video taken over the weekend is eligible to be featured next week. Featured photo by @livingitrural
“Child marriage is a root cause for a lot of the issues that girls face,” says photojournalist Stephanie Sinclair (@stephsinclairpix). Her ongoing 15-year series “Too Young to Wed” (@tooyoungtowed) sheds light on the challenges girls face — cyclical poverty, curtailed education, psychological trauma, sexual violence and, at times, the transmission of HIV — when forced to marry at a young age. The work has taken her to numerous countries where the practice is common, including Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Nigeria and Yemen. “While it has similarities in certain parts of the world, it has differences,” Stephanie says. “There’s different cultural nuances in each place.” Today in Washington, D.C., the International Women’s Media Foundation (@theiwmf) is celebrating Stephanie with the Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award. “It’s a little bit bittersweet because the award is in the name of a colleague whose life ended doing this work,” explains Stephanie. “It means even more to be recognized with an award with Anja’s name. We crossed paths several times in Iraq and Afghanistan. I just don’t want to go without saying — it means a lot.” Photo by @stephsinclairpix
Hello, world! It's time for a hair-raising edition of #WeeklyFluff. Apparently, one cat’s trash is Ryo Yamazaki’s (@rojiman) treasure. Maru (pictured) is one of the three felines whose shed fur is recycled and carefully crafted into hats for cats. Follow @rojiman to keep up with this creative haberdasher’s designs.
As often as he can, Behzad Rahmani Poor (@_bezzad) spends the morning with residents at a local homeless shelter in Shiraz, Iran. “The teakettles never stop boiling,” he says. “Drinking tea is the most pleasurable thing they have.” #WHPgoodmorning Photo by @_bezzad
It took Amy Corson (@amy_corson) a few tries at setting a timer on her camera and hopping under the covers to get a shot she liked, but the playful result was worth the effort. “Good mornings and coffee are pretty synonymous,” she says. “You can’t have one without the other.” #WHPgoodmorning Follow along to see more of our favorite submissions to last weekend’s hashtag project. Photo by @amy_corson
A pair of birds stop by for breakfast, served up by a helpful hand. #WHPgoodmorning Photo @jackmanchiu
This little Easter bunny is tuckered out from a weekend of friends, family and a visit to tulip fields near Amsterdam. 🐰#WHPgoodmorning Follow along to see more of our favorite submissions to last weekend’s hashtag project. Photo by @thesematters
Starting this week, you can save posts into private collections. Tap and hold the bookmark icon underneath any post to save it directly to a collection. You can create and name a new collection when you save a post, or you can add it to one you’ve already created. You can also create a collection out of your existing saved posts. Tap the plus icon in the top right corner, give your collection a name and select the saved posts you’d like to add. You can find your collections on the saved posts tab on your profile. Just like all saved posts, your collections are private — only you can see them. Since we introduced the ability to save posts last December, 46 percent of Instagrammers have saved at least one post. Whether you want to plan your next day trip, revisit your favorite artists’ illustrations or always have some animal videos on hand, collections can help you keep track of the posts you want to remember. To learn more about save collections, check out help.instagram.com. This update is available for iOS and Android in the Apple App Store and Google Play as part of Instagram version 10.16.
Food lovers from around the world flock to @coachella for a reason. The annual music and arts celebration pays careful attention to their curation of food, bringing together a list of vendors ranging from Los Angeles’ finest gourmet chefs to food truck favorites who give a festival twist to their signature dishes — think fruit-filled acai bowls, Peruvian-Mexican burritos and fresh ceviche topped with uni. Afters Ice Cream (@aftersicecream) is one vendor scooping flavorful cones this weekend. “We use local ingredients when possible, and we do everything by hand, in house,” says Joshua Stevens, who manages festivals and catering for the small-batch ice cream company. Founded in Fountain Valley, California, Afters’ flavors range from Vietnamese-influenced jasmine milk to a play on the traditional cookies and cream – a vibrant blue-colored ice cream with Oreo chunks called Cookie Monster. “Whether you’re 6 months old or 99 years old, everyone loves that flavor. The color really sticks out.” Photo of @aftersicecream by @jnsilva
Eight hundred sakura trees live in Tokyo on the Meguro River. Takashi Komatsubara (@takashi_komatsubara) captured one in all its glory at night. 🌸 “The Japanese strongly feel the four seasons in their daily lives,” explains Takashi. “Many people love the cherry blossoms in spring.” #TheWeekOnInstagram Photo by @takashi_komatsubara