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The Embassy of Kindness (@theembassyofkindness) all started at an InstaMeet in Melbourne, Australia. Kanesan Nathan (@legojacker) and Amal Bleed (@toffyinc) led a photo walk around the city, documenting what kindness looked like with fellow, local Instagrammers. Then, they started talking to strangers. “Our very first portrait of kindness was a man called Philip. He was kind but he was skeptical about the power of kindness to change the world,” explains Kanesan. “We looked at each other and thought, ‘Challenge accepted.’” Today, through their portraiture and captions, The Embassy of Kindness seeks to exemplify how kindness can connect us all. “Any act, no matter how big or small, has the power to change a person’s life in a profound way,” says Amal. “It’s about celebrating our shared humanity.” For this Worldwide InstaMeet (#WWIM15❤️), Kanesan will lead an event from Canberra, where he now lives, at the Australian National Botanic Gardens, and Amal will host from Melbourne’s city center. Both InstaMeets encourage participants to start conversations about kindness and create portraits that have become the basis for The Embassy’s photo project. @theembassyofkindness photos by @toffyinc and @legojacker
Hello, world! Today’s #WeeklyFluff is Marry (@hamstermarry), a cute and curious hamster who hails from Thailand. Marry enjoys napping, playing around and, as you can see, the occasional joy ride. Follow @hamstermarry to ensure you never miss out on an adventure.
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Photographer Daniella Zalcman (@dzalcman) has her #EyesOn a stolen generation. Starting in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, indigenous children across the United States, Canada and Australia were taken from their families and placed in boarding schools in an effort to assimilate them into western culture — and to strip away their own. Phyllis Kitching (pictured), an Aboriginal Australian, recalls her childhood to Daniella. “No one could ever understand what I experienced,” Phyllis says. “I can describe it and you might understand my words, but you'll never understand what I lost in that place.” Using portraits, artifacts, oral testimonies and composite images, Daniella explores the enduring legacy of these programs. “The story, at its core, is about memory and intergenerational trauma and how much that can affect not just a population and its cultural identity, but that of future generations as well,” she says. Explore more of Daniella’s work on our Instagram story. Photo of Phyllis Kitching by @dzalcman
“We should all enjoy the simple things in life, whatever our age,” says Marcelo García Calviño (@marchi3003), who brought his best friend @veronarupes (whom he met through Instagram) to one of his favorite spots in Cabo de Home, Spain. “As soon as she saw that giant shell, she couldn’t resist the temptation to climb through as if she were a child again.” #WHPyoungatheart Follow along as we feature more of our favorite submissions to last weekend’s hashtag project. Photo by @marchi3003
A simple reminder from Turtle Williams (@turtledove.a): You’re never too old to make a wish. #WHPyoungatheart Photo by @turtledove.a
Spotted in the Philippines: Timothy Genesis (@thykopi) laughs as he and a friend are knocked down by a playful wave. #WHPyoungatheart Follow along as we feature more of our favorite submissions to last weekend’s hashtag project. Photo by @thykopi
Flying at more than 220 miles (354 kilometers) per hour, Amelie Windel (@ams_w) has bigger things to worry about than a picture-perfect smile. “It’s a high-stress environment,” says 26-year-old Amelie, the youngest female aerobatic pilot in the UK. “One thing I want to change is how female athletes are perceived — or any female in a typically male-dominated world.” Amelie doesn’t buy into the expectation that she should always be smiling ear to ear; her focus is on overcoming everyday obstacles and, of course, her time in the sky. “Aerobatics is ultimate 3-D freedom,” she says. “In a modern-day world, many women still face hardships due to their gender and feel like they can’t be themselves in day-to-day life. But when I’m in that cockpit, it’s just me. I’m completely in charge of what I’m doing.” Check out our Instagram story to see more from Amelie in the sky. ✈️ This post is in celebration of Women’s History Month. Throughout March, we’ll be highlighting the stories of women doing extraordinary things around the world. Video by @ams_w
Starting today, you’ll have the option to save your live video to your phone at the end of a broadcast. While live videos will continue to disappear from the app when you’re done, this update gives you the flexibility to hold onto your video and re-watch it later, especially if something exciting happens during your broadcast that you want to remember or share. After your live broadcast ends, tap Save in the upper right corner. You’ll only be able to save your video — not the comments, likes, number of viewers or any live interactions. After saving, tap Done and your live video will be saved to your camera roll but will no longer be available in the app. We are excited by how our community is using live video to connect with their friends and followers in the moment. This is just the first of many improvements we’ll be making to live videos this year. To learn more about today’s updates, check out help.instagram.com. These updates are available as part of Instagram version 10.12 available for iOS in the Apple App Store and for Android in Google Play.
A herd of deer wandering through the still-wintry countryside of Hokkaido, Japan, drew Hidetoshi Kikuchi’s (@hidetoshi_kikuchi) attention — and his drone, theirs. #TheWeekOnInstagram Photo by @hidetoshi_kikuchi
“My art practice is born out of working on my bedroom floor with whatever resources are accessible,” says Aleia Murawski (@aleia), an artist who lives in Chicago. “My art has been shown mostly within DIY women-led art spaces and projects. It is a much different framework than the art world I studied in school. It is less about economy and more about forming relationships with other artists. I see this more and more: young artists starting projects to promote one another, to lift each other up and to create safe spaces and opportunities for each other.” This post is part of “In Search of Us,” a digital salon curated by @petrafcollins and @bellhoox. Their upcoming event #PopRallyxPetra at @themuseumofmodernart celebrates the representation of women by women. Photos and videos by @aleia
For Akhwaf Habiburrahman (@akhwaf), an Indonesian photographer living in Germany, the unplanned photos are the best ones — like this one captured just before sunset from a skate park in Frankfurt, Germany. “The more spontaneous the shot, the better it is.” #TheWeekOnInstagram Photo by @akhwaf
Our #BoomerangOfTheWeek from Leticia Ramos (@letizilla) takes us on a wild rainbow ride. 🌈 Add #BoomerangOfTheWeek to your next Boomerang’s caption — yours might show up here on @instagram.
Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPyoungatheart Age really is just a number. This weekend, head out into the world and capture playful, candid photos and videos showing how life is better when we keep a touch of whimsy in every day. Here’s how to get started: Turn the mundane into the magical by observing daily scenes through the eyes of a child. Clouds become animals, the ground turns to lava and a cardboard box lets you travel through time. Have you kept any mementos from your own childhood? Take a video, Boomerang or multi-post to show their presence and meaning. Just grab your camera and be joyful. Be spontaneous. Be silly! We could all do with taking ourselves a little less seriously. PROJECT RULES: Please add the #WHPyoungatheart hashtag only to photos and videos taken over this weekend and only submit your own visuals to the project. If you include music in your video submissions, please only use music to which you own the rights. Any tagged photo or video taken over the weekend is eligible to be featured next week. Featured photo by @halno
The Giving Keys (@thegivingkeys) opens doors by employing people who are transitioning out of homelessness. “Our goal is to have everyone feel unique, special and one-of-a-kind,” says actress and singer-songwriter Caitlin Crosby (@caitlincrosby), who founded the jewelry line nine years ago. “I think that we might all feel like keys, sometimes; maybe we feel used, flawed, discarded. Each key reminds us that we can persevere and be resilient.” Growing up in Los Angeles, Caitlin was disheartened by the large homeless population. “I always felt it was such an injustice, being in the backyard of one of the wealthiest cities,” she says. But she admits that figuring out how to help can feel overwhelming. “It seems so insurmountable. People get intimidated and don’t do anything. I encourage people to instead focus on the one — focus on the one person that you’re passing on the way to work. Focus on the one person that makes your heart jump a little bit with compassion.” This post is in celebration of Women’s History Month. Throughout March, we’ll be highlighting the stories of women doing extraordinary things around the world. Photo by @thegivingkeys
Born and raised in Ethiopia’s capital city, Addis Ababa, 23-year-old Eyerusalem Jiregna (@eyerusalem_a_jiregna) knows a thing or two about fast-paced environments. But she also hopes that her photographs might inspire people to pause and look — really look — at the visual wonders that could be waiting around any corner. “I know that people have busy lives,” Eyerusalem says, “but when we’re rushing everywhere, we’re not seeing what’s around us. I want people to appreciate what’s in front of them, and I hope that my pictures can help make that happen.” While she finds photographing people rewarding, Eyerusalem does find herself photographing women and girls more often than men. “Motherhood in Ethiopia is so significant, and the women here work so hard,” she says. “I want to try to share their stories through my photographs.” Check out our Instagram story to learn more about Eyerusalem’s work. This post is in celebration of Women’s History Month. Throughout March, we’ll be highlighting the stories of women doing extraordinary things around the world. Photos by @eyerusalem_a_jiregna