Paralympian Beatrice Vio’s (@bebe_vio) relationship with fencing started at age 5. “It was love at first sight,” says the gold medalist, now 20, from Venice, Italy. In 2008, Beatrice contracted meningitis, which resulted in the amputation of both legs from the knee and both arms from the forearm, with severe scarring to her face and body. “Getting back into fencing was the only thing I had on my mind,” she says. “Some people said it was impossible, but I did it!” Today, Beatrice competes in wheelchair fencing, using a special prosthetic device, created by her father, to hold her foil (a fencing weapon). “In wheelchair fencing, you can’t move backward — you can only attack,” she says. “This is the same thing that you have to do in life, and I always do.” This post is in celebration of Women’s History Month. Throughout March, we’ll be highlighting the stories of women doing extraordinary things around the world. Photos by @bebe_vio
InstaMeets have been a part of our community since the very early days of Instagram. They are gatherings of people who come together to connect over their shared passions and experiences. And Worldwide InstaMeet 15 (#WWIM15❤️) is happening this weekend, March 25-26! Join tens of thousands of people around the world to share, explore and celebrate while spreading this InstaMeet’s theme: kindness. Our features like Instagram Stories and Instagram Live offer even more opportunities to get creative and capture your experience in real time. Browse #WWIM15❤️ throughout the weekend to explore communities around the world, and check in on Monday for a look back at some of our favorites. To find an InstaMeet near you, check out community.instagram.com. Photo by @thiagolbrito
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“Yo what up! I’m Liza Koshy (@lizakoshy) and I’m just a little brown girl with big dreams in a big tree. One of those dreams has been to simply spread some good ol’ positivity. It’s been a blessing to spread it around online. I found an awesome community of people who have the same dad-joke humor, same positive morals and appreciation for laughter. That’s a community I’m down to chill with. If I could take my 10.4 million followers out for pizza, I would ... (as long as one of them paid for it). **Three more things I’m grateful for:** 🙌 @daviddobrik. My boyfriend, who’s a pretty cute inspiration of mine. He is the most positive, kind and cute (did I say that yet?) human being. You can follow him ... but he has a girlfriend. 🙌 @humansofny is incredibly real. It makes me tear up, and crack up. Anyone can appreciate how they spread stories, spread insight and spread kindness. 🙌 @charitywater puts a face to such an important cause. Giving and helping where you’re able to see the impact made across the world. It’s freaking beautiful. If you could give a 🙌 to three Instagram accounts who support or inspire you, who would they be? Post using #🙌🙌🙌 for a chance to be featured on Instagram.
Hello, world! Today’s #WeeklyFluff is Marry (@hamstermarry), a cute and curious hamster who hails from Thailand. Marry enjoys napping, playing around and, as you can see, the occasional joy ride. Follow @hamstermarry to ensure you never miss out on an adventure.
Photographer Daniella Zalcman (@dzalcman) has her #EyesOn a stolen generation. Starting in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, indigenous children across the United States, Canada and Australia were taken from their families and placed in boarding schools in an effort to assimilate them into western culture — and to strip away their own. Phyllis Kitching (pictured), an Aboriginal Australian, recalls her childhood to Daniella. “No one could ever understand what I experienced,” Phyllis says. “I can describe it and you might understand my words, but you'll never understand what I lost in that place.” Using portraits, artifacts, oral testimonies and composite images, Daniella explores the enduring legacy of these programs. “The story, at its core, is about memory and intergenerational trauma and how much that can affect not just a population and its cultural identity, but that of future generations as well,” she says. Explore more of Daniella’s work on our Instagram story. Photo of Phyllis Kitching by @dzalcman
“We should all enjoy the simple things in life, whatever our age,” says Marcelo García Calviño (@marchi3003), who brought his best friend @veronarupes (whom he met through Instagram) to one of his favorite spots in Cabo de Home, Spain. “As soon as she saw that giant shell, she couldn’t resist the temptation to climb through as if she were a child again.” #WHPyoungatheart Follow along as we feature more of our favorite submissions to last weekend’s hashtag project. Photo by @marchi3003
A simple reminder from Turtle Williams (@turtledove.a): You’re never too old to make a wish. #WHPyoungatheart Photo by @turtledove.a
Spotted in the Philippines: Timothy Genesis (@thykopi) laughs as he and a friend are knocked down by a playful wave. #WHPyoungatheart Follow along as we feature more of our favorite submissions to last weekend’s hashtag project. Photo by @thykopi
March 20 marks Nowruz, the #PersianNewYear and the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. For Iranian photojournalist Majid Saeedi (@majidsaeedi), the 13-day holiday marks some of his sweetest childhood memories, like family gatherings around tasty meals and sweet treats, participating in traditional ceremonies and picnicking outside on the final day. “It is a family holiday and spending a while with my family is the best memory that I have from Nowruz,” he says. Photo by @majidsaeedi
Starting today, you’ll have the option to save your live video to your phone at the end of a broadcast. While live videos will continue to disappear from the app when you’re done, this update gives you the flexibility to hold onto your video and re-watch it later, especially if something exciting happens during your broadcast that you want to remember or share. After your live broadcast ends, tap Save in the upper right corner. You’ll only be able to save your video — not the comments, likes, number of viewers or any live interactions. After saving, tap Done and your live video will be saved to your camera roll but will no longer be available in the app. We are excited by how our community is using live video to connect with their friends and followers in the moment. This is just the first of many improvements we’ll be making to live videos this year. To learn more about today’s updates, check out help.instagram.com. These updates are available as part of Instagram version 10.12 available for iOS in the Apple App Store and for Android in Google Play.
“I want to be an artist who builds confidence in my viewers and makes them feel a little less alone,” says Grace Miceli (@artbabygirl), who lives in New York City. “Someone who helps us to understand each other and ourselves. These animations are meant to explore the complicated space a young woman inhabits, where the objects and experiences that are pushed upon you are simultaneously looked down upon by the world around you.” This post is part of “In Search of Us,” a digital salon curated by @petrafcollins and @bellhoox. Their upcoming event #PopRallyxPetra at @themuseumofmodernart celebrates the representation of women by women. Photos and videos by @artbabygirl
“My art practice is born out of working on my bedroom floor with whatever resources are accessible,” says Aleia Murawski (@aleia), an artist who lives in Chicago. “My art has been shown mostly within DIY women-led art spaces and projects. It is a much different framework than the art world I studied in school. It is less about economy and more about forming relationships with other artists. I see this more and more: young artists starting projects to promote one another, to lift each other up and to create safe spaces and opportunities for each other.” This post is part of “In Search of Us,” a digital salon curated by @petrafcollins and @bellhoox. Their upcoming event #PopRallyxPetra at @themuseumofmodernart celebrates the representation of women by women. Photos and videos by @aleia
For Akhwaf Habiburrahman (@akhwaf), an Indonesian photographer living in Germany, the unplanned photos are the best ones — like this one captured just before sunset from a skate park in Frankfurt, Germany. “The more spontaneous the shot, the better it is.” #TheWeekOnInstagram Photo by @akhwaf
Imagine spending months carving, painting and working tirelessly to craft a giant, gravity-defying display of towering puppets — only to watch your creations stuffed with fireworks and burned to the ground. But there’s no sadness at Las Fallas (“the fires”), the yearly celebration in Spain that’s capped by sending hundreds of puppets off in a blaze of glory. “The meaning of burning fallas is based on burning everything bad in the year to start a new cycle,” says 25-year-old Iván Tortajada (@ivantortajada), an artist and illustrator who lives in Valencia, Spain, where the festival is held. “When you see them, the sacrifice of the whole year comes to mind. It makes your hair stand on end.” Iván has been attending Las Fallas since he was a baby and entered his first professional display in 2011. “From its conception, you know that it is ephemeral,” he says. “It makes you cry, but with happiness and emotion.” Photo by @ivantortajada
Professional Irish dancer Tyler Schwartz (@tylerschwartzdance) loves to play off his crowd’s energy. “Irish dance is a rowdy, fun and high-energy dance form that usually involves a lot of audience participation,” says 25-year-old Tyler, who lives in Chicago. “When the audience is on the same wavelength as you, there is absolutely nothing like it!” After competing around the world for many years, Tyler now shares the stage, performing with his former opponents — he calls them some of his closest friends. This year, he has Saint Patrick’s Day off. “I’m planning on meeting up with a bunch of my old Irish dance friends to celebrate,” he says. Today, we’re celebrating with Tyler’s skills. Watch our Instagram story to see some of his awe-inspiring choreography. ☘️ Video of Tyler and @missemilymacc by @tylerschwartzdance